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Showing posts with the label #Evil

The first prophecy of a savior.

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The first time a savior was foretold in the Old Testament. We have no idea whether Genesis was the first written book of the bible. Some Christians speculate Job was (and they’d be totally wrong; Job was written in a later version of biblical Hebrew, and took place in Edom). Others figure Moses wrote his psalm before he wrote the bible. In any event the first hint we have in the scriptures that humanity might need a savior, is found in Genesis 3—the story of humanity’s fall. As the story goes: Eve and Adam, the first humans, lived in paradise. God told ’em not to eat off a particular tree. A serpent tempted Eve to eat off it anyway, and Adam followed suit. The consequence: They couldn’t live in paradise any longer, ’cause the Tree of Life was there. They were driven out; Adam was cursed to fight nature in order to gain his sustenance, Eve was cursed with painful childbirth and male domination, and the serpent was cursed like so: Genesis 3.14-15 KWL 14 The L ORD God tol

“You take that back!”

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How curses freak Christians out. Curse /kərs/ n. Solemn utterance, meant to invoke supernatural evil, punishment, or harm. 2. v. Invoke supernatural evil, punishment, or harm. 3. n. Cause of evil or suffering. [Curser /'kərs.ər/ n. ] Some Christians are mighty sensitive about curses. (Also mighty sensitive about “cursing,” by which we mean profanity, but I already discussed that. ) Sometimes they call ’em “word curses,” which means precisely the same thing: You used your words to curse something. (How else are you gonna curse something? Waving one’s hands? Magic wands? Yeesh.) For certain dark Christians, any negative statement—or anything they can interpret as a negative statement—counts as a curse. Fr’instance, I could say, “Hmm, cloudy day; looks like rain.” And to their minds, I just cursed the sky. Seriously. “You take that back! Don’t you call down rain on us!” As if my casual observation has the power to call down rain—and y’know, if it could, I’d make a for

Jesus’s easy victory over the devil.

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Mark 1.12-13, Matthew 4.1-11, Luke 4.1-13. Mark 1.12-13 KWL 12 Right afterward, the Spirit threw Jesus into the wilderness. 13 Jesus was in the wilderness 40 days, getting tested by Satan. He was with the beasts. Angels were serving him. That’s the extra-short version of Jesus’s “temptations,” as they tend to be called: Peirádzo /“test” is often meant in a tempting sense, ’cause part of the test is how badly we want what’s offered. But is it in Jesus’s divine nature to go about getting these things the wrong way? Nah. He’s never gonna put himself above his Father’s will. So let’s not treat these tests like they really made Jesus doubt his commitment to the Father. Any devout Christian can easily resist such temptations. The Mark version doesn’t have a lot of details: Just Jesus and the devil, out in the middle of nowhere. Didn’t have to be way out in the middle of nowhere; in fact it’d be a stronger test of will if Jesus was just within sight of civilization. (As